Dr. DeAngelis’ study and article published in Ophthalmic Plastic Reconstructive Surgery Journal

We’re thrilled to share the recent publication of our own Kendra DeAngelis, MD’s study researching and analyzing spontaneous eyelid blinking; Eyelid Spontaneous Blink Analysis and Age-Related Changes Through High-Speed Imaging. By studying 122 patients across several age ranges, Dr. DeAngelis and her cohorts were able to determine that horizontal fissure lengths change with eyelid blinks and define one component of the eyelid sphincter. By studying 122 patients across several age ranges, Dr. DeAngelis and her cohorts were able to determine that horizontal fissure lengths change with eyelid blinks and define one component of the eyelid sphincter.

Over the course of a year, Dr. DeAngelis studied the spontaneous eyelid blink, a push-pull measurement, by recording participants’ normal eyelid blinks using an FPS 1000HD slow-motion camera. Measurements were taken of horizontal palpebral fissure width of open and closed eye(s), and the change in horizontal palpebral fissure width as related to age.

Results showed a significant difference when comparing the 20-29 age group with the 70+ age group, with the change in horizontal palpebral fissure length decreasing with age. No statistical difference was shown between females and males or between each consecutive decade.

This study, and Dr. DeAngelis’ critical research, have laid the groundwork to appreciating eyelid blinking as the result of a sphincter and naturally lead into further 3-dimensional analysis and better understanding of orbicularis oculi  (OO) activity.

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